Category: Racial Justice

Poston: Pilgrimage I

This April, I had the privilege of visiting Poston during the Poston Pilgrimage.  The Pilgrimage is organized by the families of people who had been imprisoned in Poston.  The organizers come from Los Angeles, Fresno, and Sacramento;  people come to the Pilgrimage from all… Continue Reading “Poston: Pilgrimage I”

The WRA Camp at Poston

The WRA Camp at Poston was located about 15 miles South of Parker, AZ, next to the Colorado River and the California border.   The Camp opened on June 2, 1942, and soon housed 17,814 people.  It was the third largest “city” in Arizona at… Continue Reading “The WRA Camp at Poston”

Gila River Today: Opportunity Lost

The Camp Now… This is a photo of the monument found on a hill in the Butte Camp portion of the former Gila River WRA Camp. [Source: Unknown] Consistent with its general practice, the Gila River Indian Community withheld permission from me to visit… Continue Reading “Gila River Today: Opportunity Lost”

Gila River, As it Was

On July 20, 1942, the War Relocation Authority opened the Gila River WRA Camp.  They did so over the objections of the Gila River Indian Community elders. It was a violation of Indian sovereignty, made in order to violate the Constitutional rights of the… Continue Reading “Gila River, As it Was”

Rohwer Camp, As It Was

Japanese Americans came to Rohwer via train, bus, and truck.  Everyone crossed the railroad tracks and a bridge over water to get in. The Camp… “The first day here was a sunny day, which made me homesick for California because it was always sunny… Continue Reading “Rohwer Camp, As It Was”

Rohwer Camp, Today

To get to Rohwer, you drive through the countryside north of McGehee for about 12 miles .  As you come upon the hamlet of Rohwer, you’ll drive alongside a levee and a dense row of trees on the left hand side of the road, and… Continue Reading “Rohwer Camp, Today”

The Museum at McGehee: a little jewel box.

McGehee, Arkansas is the nearest city to the Jerome and Rohwer WRA Camps, roughly halfway between them.  In 1942, McGehee had a population of about 3,600.  The two Camps had a combined  population of 16,972.  McGehee is still a small city. In the middle… Continue Reading “The Museum at McGehee: a little jewel box.”

Jerome As It Was

The National Archives have extensive photos of life in the Jerome WRA Camp.  I have selected a few that capture the heart of it and illustrate some key points made about the prison Camp.  All photos, but the last, are from the National Archives.… Continue Reading “Jerome As It Was”

Jerome as it is Now…

The Jerome WRA Camp was about 130 miles southeast of the city of Little Rock, Arkansas.  There is almost nothing left of the camp that once held 8,947 Americans of Japanese ancestry for nearly two years. When the camp was built, the land was wooded… Continue Reading “Jerome as it is Now…”

A Maximum Security Prison

This photo from the California Military Museum shows the Stockade front and center at Tule Lake.  The jail, which was built shortly after the photo was taken, was adjacent to the Stockade compound. Both feature heavily in the rest of this story. Tule Lake started… Continue Reading “A Maximum Security Prison”

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