Category: Courage in Adversity

The rest of the Journey…

I’m getting ready to visit the last three of the WRA Camps.  I’ll be going to the sites of the former WRA Camps: Minidoka, Idaho, Heart Mountain, Wyoming, and Topaz, Utah. There are three things that remain uppermost in my mind. First, the history…

Poston: People of Hope

They are people of hope… That is, the two peoples (the Japanese Americans of the Poston Community Alliance and the Colorado River Indian Tribes) are manifestations of hope.  Brought together by the respective injustices that were done to them and the hardships they have…

Poston Today: Pilgrims

Just across the highway from the Monument, on Poston Road, is a parcel of land that the Poston Community Alliance is working to turn into an active historical site. This is where the second part of the Pilgrimage took place.  We were all bused…

Poston: Pilgrimage I

This April, I had the privilege of visiting Poston during the Poston Pilgrimage.  The Pilgrimage is organized by the families of people who had been imprisoned in Poston.  The organizers come from Los Angeles, Fresno, and Sacramento;  people come to the Pilgrimage from all…

The WRA Camp at Poston

The WRA Camp at Poston was located about 15 miles South of Parker, AZ, next to the Colorado River and the California border.   The Camp opened on June 2, 1942, and soon housed 17,814 people.  It was the third largest “city” in Arizona at…

Gila River Today: Opportunity Lost

The Camp Now… This is a photo of the monument found on a hill in the Butte Camp portion of the former Gila River WRA Camp. [Source: Unknown] Consistent with its general practice, the Gila River Indian Community withheld permission from me to visit…

Gila River, As it Was

On July 20, 1942, the War Relocation Authority opened the Gila River WRA Camp.  They did so over the objections of the Gila River Indian Community elders. It was a violation of Indian sovereignty, made in order to violate the Constitutional rights of the…

Rohwer Camp, As It Was

Japanese Americans came to Rohwer via train, bus, and truck.  Everyone crossed the railroad tracks and a bridge over water to get in. The Camp… “The first day here was a sunny day, which made me homesick for California because it was always sunny…

Rohwer Camp, Today

To get to Rohwer, you drive through the countryside north of McGehee for about 12 miles .  As you come upon the hamlet of Rohwer, you’ll drive alongside a levee and a dense row of trees on the left hand side of the road, and…

The Museum at McGehee: a little jewel box.

McGehee, Arkansas is the nearest city to the Jerome and Rohwer WRA Camps, roughly halfway between them.  In 1942, McGehee had a population of about 3,600.  The two Camps had a combined  population of 16,972.  McGehee is still a small city. In the middle…

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